In all things, balance and intention

26 Apr

When I ran my first post April-15th race last weekend, the moment of silence offered beforehand left me with a lump in my throat so large, I don’t know how I fought it down as I began to run.  Although it was only a 5k, I think it was a PR for me. Seeing as this blog is yoga-influenced, I hesitate to say my snappy performance was fueled by rage and an iPod filled with Dropkick Murphys…so, instead, I’ll just say I was powered by a great inner fire. In channeling that “fire” I began to think about the great need for all of us to keep our intentions in check. And, in this case, I believe it is not only important for all of us to keep running (as so many of the popular slogans that have evolved out of this crisis remind us to do) but also to keep our thoughts with those who have suffered.

I once read a book by Deepak Chopra (okay, fine! laugh all you want) in which he cites a study conducted on a group of patients in a hospital who are all ill with the same disease. Without their knowledge, one half of the group of patients had an individual (whom they did not know) who was assigned to pray for their recovery. The other half of the patients were not assigned someone who would pray for their recovery. After a period of several weeks, the study found that those patients who were kept in the intentions of a stranger experienced a recovery that was vastly better than their lonely counterparts.

In yoga, we talk about focusing our intentions all the time. We talk about the need to draw on our inner power and the need to do good. Similarly, I recently listened to an interview on NPR in which an experienced runner told the newscaster that she hoped the “karmic balance of running could be restored.” I can’t find the interview but it was an important point. There’s been so much talk about needing to get runners back out on the ground to start pounding the pavement in defiance of the bombings (which, I admittedly did). But, while it is necessary to get out there and reclaim the roads, it is also important to do so with a certain mindfulness. If you’re like me, I suggest you get the rage (or…ahem…fire) out of your system and then come back to your core, your center and send your best intentions out to all of those who have experienced great loss.

If you’re looking for a way to get started and to calm your mind, I found this article from Yoga Journal to be helpful: http://www.yogajournal.com/wisdom/926

They’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again:

Stay strong Boston.

From N.J. with love.

Photo from businessinsider.com

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